Arrighi Portraits

Staying with the Arrighi family, these portraits and photographs are all labelled. I won’t say too much about them, but would love to receive contact from anyone who is interested, recognises or is related to this family!

Some of the images are clickable, for larger versions.

William Hunter Arrighi (b.1910)

William Hunter Arrighi cropped

William Hunter Arrighi small

Middle son of James Arrighi (see previous post), the inscription on the back of this portrait says WA – Taken in Rugby – age about 19. He is easily recognisable from the family photograph, which must have been taken around the same time.

James Norman Louis Arrighi (b.1908)

James Norman Louis Arrighi cropped

James Norman Louis Arrighi portrait

The eldest of the three sons of James Arrighi, the inscription on the back simply says Norman Arrighi. It was taken by S H Greenway of Northampton and, like his brother above, Norman is easily recognisable from the family photograph in my previous post.

Another portrait (below) shows Norman at a slightly older age.

James Norman Louis Arrighi portrait

Mr Arrighi

Mr Arrighi

Mr Arrighi - back of photo

 

Copied from a photograph, this print is mounted on a large board and bears a sticker for J. C. Matheson, Chemist, 27 Bruntsfield Place, Edinburgh. The pencilled writing is difficult to read, but having searched the newspaper archives my best guess would be Mr Arrighi – 44 Merchiston Avenue. The address was first occupied by Louis John Arrighi b.1863 (brother of James Arrighi) and later by his son, Frederick Wilson Brown Arrighi b.1906. I think it likely that Mr Arrighi is in fact Fred(erick), who can be found at Merchiston Avenue in the British Telephone Directories during the late 1920s and 1930s.

I think he bears more than a passing resemblance to his cousins above, don’t you?

 

Information was gathered from the British Newspaper ArchiveAncestry and Scotland’s People.

 

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Arrighi Family

James Arrighi and Family (1)

James Arrighi and Family (2)

Two separate photographs of the Arrighi family, from the same bundle but mounted on different card.

The upper image was presumably in a large presentation folder, but the protective cover has been removed. It was taken by John Mills, 10 St. Giles Street, Northampton and has a lovely sepia tone. The lower image is mounted on stiff card and trimmed to the size of the actual photograph. It is black and white and shows quite a lot of wear. I prefer the sepia tone, which renders the details more finely.

You might recognise the man on the right of the photograph from my previous blog post. It is James Arrighi, looking a little older but still as smartly dressed. His handsome family consists of his wife, Agnes Reid Hunter, and their four children. Louis Alfred Arrighi, the youngest child, is sitting between his parents. He was born in 1914, which dates the photograph to the late 1920s.

Standing at the back from left to right are William Hunter Arrighi b.1910, James Norman Louis Arrighi b.1908 and Amelia Compton Arrighi b.1905.

Sadly the youngest child, Louis, was killed during WWII at the age of 26. He was initially reported as missing (1) but later found to have died. He is buried in the Netherlands. It must have been a terrible time for the family, not knowing what had become of him.

Northampton Mercury - Friday 04 April 1941
Image © Johnston Press plc. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

In July of 1941 a memorial was held for Louis at the Congregational Church in Yardley Hastings, Northamptonshire (2). Hopefully the family were able to take some comfort from this.

Northampton Mercury - Friday 25 July 1941
Image © Johnston Press plc. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

I have yet more portraits to share, this time of the two older boys. Please check out my next blog post.

References:
(1) Northampton Mercury – Friday 04 April 1941
(2) Northampton Mercury – Friday 25 July 1941

Newspaper clippings courtesy of the British Newspaper Archive; The British Library Board. Further research carried out using Ancestry and Find A Grave.

James Arrighi & Castle Ashby

James Arrighi

 

On the back of this portrait is written ‘James Arrighi 1877-1960’ and he was the youngest son of Louis Arrighi (see previous post). The portrait was taken by S. H. Greenway Studios, Northampton and Daventry, and probably dates to the late 1900s when James was around thirty years old. His beard and moustache resemble that worn by King George V and give him a very regal look!

Sometime between 1903 and 1905, James Arrighi took the position of Clerk of Works at Castle Ashby in Northamptonshire. He remained in the area even after retirement, eventually leaving in 1950 according to this entry in the Northampton Chronicle and Echo (25th April):

Northampton Chronicle and Echo - Tuesday 25 April 1950Image © Johnston Press plc. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

Researching James’ family, I was intrigued by his daughter’s middle name, Amelia Compton Arrighi, who was born in 1905. She was presumably named after the Compton family who reside at Castle Ashby and have done so since the 1500s. I also found the following postcard of Castle Ashby House among the photographs. A souvenir of the Arrighi family’s time there, perhaps?

Castle Ashby PostcardCastle Ashby Postcard - back

James Arrighi passed away in 1960 at the age of eighty-four. I have more photographs relating to his family that I plan to share, but will save them for future blog posts.

Newspaper clippings/information courtesy of the British Newspaper Archive; The British Library Board. Further research carried out using Ancestry and Scotland’s People.

Isabella Arrighi (but which one?)

Isabella Arrighi Portrait

Isabella Arrighi Portrait - Photographer

This is probably one of my favourite portraits and, like the previous portrait of Louis Arrighi, was taken by the studio of Scottish photographer John Campbell Harper. From the fashion of the day (the dress and hairstyle) I would estimate the date as mid-1910s. The ‘Campbell Harper’ studio started life in Leith Walk around 1908, so this date would be consistent.

The inscription on the back of the photograph identifies the sitter as Isabella Arrighi, born 1894 and therefore around 20 to 25 years old. Hmm. With no disrespect, I suspect the lady in the portrait was older than this.

Isabella Arrighi Portrait - Writing

So is the inscription wrong?

A little research shows there were several Isabellas in the Arrighi family.

The Isabella Arrighi identified by the inscription was grand-daughter of Louis Arrighi and daughter of Louis’ eldest son, Louis John Arrighi (b.1863). But in my view, she can be discounted on the basis of being too young.

Louis Arrighi’s wife was also called Isabella. Born in 1841, she died in 1910 prior to the likely date of this photograph. So she can also be discounted.

Another Isabella Arrighi was daughter of Louis’ older brother, Leopoldo Arrighi. She was born around 1862 in Edinburgh, although a precise age is difficult to obtain due to her shaving a few years off as the decades went on! She died in 1939 and would have been in her fifties during the 1910s.

Lastly, Louis’ own daughter was called Isabella Richardson Arrighi. She was born in 1869 and died (unmarried) in 1929, being buried with her parents at Comely Bank Cemetery, Edinburgh. During the 1910s she would have been in her forties and in my opinion is the most likely candidate for this portrait, not only because of her age, but also because I found the portrait alongside that of Louis Arrighi (see previous blog post).

There could of course be other Isabella Arrighis’ I have yet to come across.

This all begs the question as to why the inscription is incorrect? And also acts as a warning against taking any named photograph at face value. A small amount of research can go a long way, although it can also muddy the waters!

Isabella Arrighi Portrait - front & back

Names and dates were obtained from Ancestry.co.uk and Scotlands People, but should only be used as guidance.

Louis Arrighi b.1836

Louis Arrighi 1836-1919

This portrait is identified on the back as ‘Grandpa Arrighi an Italian / Benedetto Louis Arrighi 1836-1919‘ in two different pens and styles of handwriting. It is signed by J. Campbell Harper of Leith (near Edinburgh, Scotland).

Louis Arrighi 1836-1919 (writing)

J Campbell Harper, Leith (photographer)

Louis Arrighi married Isabella Richardson in 1859 in Edinburgh, where they lived throughout their married life. Both Louis and Isabella are buried at Comely Bank Cemetery.

Searching the newspaper archives I came across an article in the Dundee Courier (Tuesday 16 December 1952) which mentions ‘Louis Arrighi, the young Italian who arrived in Scotland to seek his fortune‘. The article goes on to say that ‘he undertook work on the Wallace Monument at Causewayhead, Stirling, and the Wallace Statue, Aberdeen‘. Unfortunately I haven’t been able to confirm this claim, although the censuses do list his occupation as ornamental plasterer and, later, sculptor.

I have more Arrighi family portraits to share, and hope to discover more about Louis as I go along!

Louis Arrighi 1836-1919 (portrait)